Tag Archives: feeding baby solid foods

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Baby Food Recipes: 11 Months

Time to face facts: your 11 month old baby is barely a baby anymore! Remember those early days of feeding your little ones drippy, runny purees and watching her spit them back at you? How far we’ve come! Now, your 11 month old should be getting better and better at feeding herself finger foods. In fact, you may have started offering her entire finger food meals! And your baby doesn’t need those single-ingredient dishes anymore; now she’s completely ready to tackle real food, with lots of ingredients.

Cereal Recipes

Infant cereal is a very small part of your 11 month old baby’s diet now. Instead, your 11 month old baby will be getting the grain servings he needs from foods like bread, crackers, and pasta. You may still want to offer your 11 month old a small serving of infant cereal every now and then, however. You can purchase ready-made, powdered cereals at the grocery store, but you can also make your own (for a lot less money!) Visit our Baby Cereal Recipes for step-by-step instructions on how to make your baby’s rice and oatmeal cereal from scratch.

Fruit Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Fruit Recipes to see a sampling of delicious fruit purees and your 9 month old baby is sure to love.  At 11 months old, your baby can eat all kinds of fruits, including the strawberries and tomatoes that you’ve probably been waiting to offer. (And yes — tomatoes are fruit!)

Vegetable Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Vegetable Recipes for a listing of veggie purees and mashes that’ll keep your 9 month old on the path to healthy, nutritious eating.  Your 11 month old can now eat all kinds of veggies, including corn.

Protein Recipes

By 11 month old, your baby is eating beans, eggs, meat, and poultry, and maybe even tofu! Now that he’s older, he’s finally ready to sample fish and nuts. Visit our Baby Food Protein Recipes for tips on easy ways to prepare white fish.

Meal Recipes

Your 11 month old may be getting bored with those single-ingredient means; she may start showing a preference for real food. You can continue to offer her more and more table food; you can also continue creating special dishes just for her. 🙂 Visit our 5 Great Recipes page for meal ideas. We’re betting your 11 month old won’t be able to get enough of the whole wheat chocolate muffins!

Feeding Fact

Get ready for a transition — it’s time for your baby to stop relying on you to feed him every bit and to instead learn to feed himself (that is, if he hasn’t already!) Whenever possible, encourage your baby to feed himself small pieces of finger food. Consider making one or more meals “finger food meals” to give your baby plenty of practice at self-feeding.

Is your baby already a finger-feeding expert? If you’re feeling brave, give your baby a small plastic dish of food, a spoon, and let her practice spoon feeding. Try something like pudding or yogurt, which’ll stick to a spoon easily. Take note: this experiment will be less painful for you if your baby’s wearing only a diaper (no messy clothing to wash later!) and if you put down a splash mat over your nice floor 🙂

For ideas that’ll help you create a feeding and sleeping schedule for your 10 month old, check out the recommended 11 month schedule available at BabySleepSite.com.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your 11 month old baby’s favorite foods?  Share your recipe and feeding ideas below!

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Baby Food Recipes: 10 Months

Your 10 month old baby is probably a “solids pro” by now! He’s tackled all kinds of tastes and textures, and has started enjoying some real meals. By 10 months, your baby will be ready to start eating more and more table food. You can start chopping or slicing the foods you’re eating at mealtime and offering them to your baby (provided the foods you’re eating aren’t too crunchy or chewy, and aren’t allergenic.) This means you’ll need to make fewer purees and mashes to freeze.

Cereal Recipes

Infant cereal starts become less a part of your baby’s diet at 10 months. Instead, you can start to offer your 10 month old baby other types of grains, like bread, crackers, and pasta. However, you’ll probably still want to offer a few tablespoons of baby cereal to your 10 month old. You can purchase ready-made, powdered cereals at the grocery store, but you can also make your own (for a lot less money!) Visit our Baby Cereal Recipes for step-by-step instructions on how to make your baby’s rice and oatmeal cereal from scratch.

Fruit Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Fruit Recipes to see a sampling of delicious fruit purees and your 9 month old baby is sure to love.  By 10 months, your baby is eating a whole rainbow of fruit, including blueberries, melon, and kiwi!

Vegetable Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Vegetable Recipes for a listing of veggie purees and mashes that’ll keep your 10 month old on the path to healthy, nutritious eating.  At 10 months, your baby’s ready to start eating broccoli and spinach. (Don’t jump to any conclusions; he may love those veggies!)

Protein Recipes

At 10 months, your baby’s probably gobbling up poultry and beans (and possibly eggs, if she’s not allergic.) Now, she’s also ready to try meat (including beef) and even tofu! Visit our Baby Food Protein Recipes for tips on easy ways to prepare meat and tofu.

Meal Recipes

Up to this point, making homemade food for your baby has meant whipping up lots of single-ingredient purees and mashes. Well, it’s time to change that mindset; as a 10 month old, your baby is ready for you to cook “real” food for her! This can mean offering her small amounts of table food (as long as that table food contains ingredients that she’s already tried). It can also mean creating special dishes just for her. 🙂 Visit our 5 Great Recipes page for meal ideas. Your 10 month old will love the broccoli cheddar nuggets, the sweet potato pancakes, and the Hawaiian pork and rice dinner!

Feeding Fact

We’re way past the smooth, runny purees of just a few months ago; now, your baby should be comfortable with thick, chunky mashes. You can also start offering (very) small pieces of food at this point. Try chopping a chicken breast, or cutting a slice of cheese into tiny cubes. Your baby may not be able to feed himself yet, but you can feed him these tiny pieces.

 

For ideas that’ll help you create a feeding and sleeping schedule for your 10 month old, check out the recommended 10 month schedule available at BabySleepSite.com.

 

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your 10 month old baby’s favorite foods?  Share your recipe and feeding ideas below!


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5 Tips On Feeding Treats To Your Baby

If you’ve read many of our posts, you know by now that one of the things we emphasize on this blog is healthy eating. We’re committed to the idea that starting a baby on the healthiest possible foods is the first step to a lifetime of healthy eating for your child.

We’ve written about the importance of feeding your baby fresh, or lightly-cooked, fruits and vegetables. We’ve emphasized that it’s best to offer lean proteins and whole grains, and that you should keep sugar and salt to a minimum. We’ve even touched on whether or not it’s best to buy organic produce for your baby.

Special Occasions Mean Treats!

But sometimes, life throws a special occasion our way, doesn’t it? And many of us tend to mark our special occasions by serving special food — fatty, sweet, calorie-packed treats that delight our taste buds but aren’t so great for our waistlines!

How do we handle these kinds of special occasions with our babies? Do we let them indulge in treats, or do we withhold the junk food?

Below are 5 tips to help you sort out how your’e going to handle special-occasion treats with your baby.

5 Tips On Offering Treats To Your Baby

If your baby won’t miss it, then don’t offer it.

A 6 month old likely has no idea that a warm chocolate chip cookie is one thousand times more delicious than a plate of steamed carrots. So why offer the cookie in the first place, if he’s not going to miss it? What’s more, once he does get a taste for sweet, gooey treats, you can bet he’s going to love them, and that he’s going to clamor for more. So stick with offering healthy foods and skipping junk food for as long as you can.

Load your baby up on healthy foods first.

If you’re headed to a gathering where you know there’s going to be lots of tasty treats, commit to filling your baby up with healthy foods first. That might mean feeding your baby at home, before you leave; it might also mean packing some healthy snacks and taking them with you. Stuff your baby full of nourishing food so that she won’t be hungry for treats. This way, even if you do offer a small treat, she’ll be so full, she probably won’t eat much.

Set the example.

Parents, this one is hard. Believe me, I know. But it’s important! We can’t expect our little ones to embrace healthy eating habits if we as parents aren’t willing to eat healthy, too. Yes, our babies are very young, and they probably aren’t closely watching and evaluating our eating habits at this point. But it’s never too early to start walking the walk, right?

So the next time you and your baby are faced with a table full of delicious treats, make sure you model the eating habits you want your baby to have. This means limiting your own indulgence, and not filling up on sugary, fatty, salty junk food.

Don’t be afraid to say no.

If you do decide to let your baby indulge in a small treat, know in advance that he’s going to want more. And that just makes sense, right? When has anyone ever been content to eat one tiny brownie, when there’s a whole pan available? 

If your little one beings wailing for more, don’t be afraid to firmly say no. When it comes to food, it’s probably a good idea to set boundaries early, and to let your baby know that when mom or dad says “All done,” it actually means all done.

Remember to relax and enjoy the moment.

It’s a good and wise thing to limit your baby’s intake of treats, of course. Lots of extra sugar isn’t good for our little ones! But let’s remember that a little extra sugar certainly isn’t going to do serious damage. I know many moms who try to follow a “No sugar before 12 months” rule. And while that’s an admirable vow, it doesn’t always play out practically. Special occasions happen, and sometimes, you just have to relax and let your baby eat some cake. It’ll be more fun for everyone if (every once in awhile) you do just that.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

How do you feed treats to your baby? Share your tips below!

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The Best Ways to Introduce New Foods To Your Baby

Introducing a new food to your baby is an “iffy” thing. He might adore green beans the first time he eats them, and gobble them up with relish. On the other hand, he might spit them right back out and give you his biggest glare.

There’s no way to predict how your baby will react to new foods. But there are steps you can take to help your baby enjoy her new food as much as possible.

  • Offer the breast or a bottle before offering a new food.

    This is good advice to follow anyway (especially when you’re first starting solid foods.) The idea here is that your baby will be calmer and more receptive to solid food if he’s not totally hungry. It’s especially important to do this when you’re about to offer him something new.

  • Offer new foods when your baby is well-rested.

    You know by now that when your baby’s exhausted, nothing goes well. And feeding is no different! So pick a time during the day when you know your baby will be rested and happy — maybe after her morning nap — and offer the brand-new food then. This’ll help ensure she has the positive attitude and patience she’ll need to try something new.

  • Offer a small amount of the new food.

    Feeding your little guy spinach for the first time? This is not the moment to make a big ol’ serving! Instead, prepare a half-sized portion of the new food. If your baby loves it, you can always make more; if he isn’t so receptive, you won’t be wasting a bunch of leftover food. And as you feed the new food to your baby, offer half-sized spoonfuls — just enough to give him a taste.

  • Alternate a new food with a familiar one.

    If you’ve got a stubborn baby on your hands who simply doesn’t embrace new foods, you may have to resort to a few tricks to get a new food into her belly! This trick is simple: you prepare two dishes of food, one being a food that she’s familiar with, and the other being a food that’s new. As you begin to feed, offer a few spoonfuls of the familiar food first. Then, offer a spoonful of the new food. Follow it up with another spoonful of the familiar food.

    This can help “soften the blow” of a new food. You might find that your baby is willing to take a few spoonfuls of the new food if she also gets spoonfuls of something that’s familiar, and that she likes. This is also a good technique to use when you’re feeding baby something she’s tried before and hates. I use this trick a lot with my youngest, who’s a major vegetable-hater!

  • Be calm and stay patient.

    It can be so frustrating trying to feed a baby a food he clearly doesn’t like. You know he needs to eat his broccoli, but he has other ideas! But it’s important that you remain patient and calm throughout a feeding that isn’t going well. Our babies are smart, and they tend to pick up on our own anxiety. If your baby senses your frustration, it’ll likely only make things worse.

  • Don’t give up — keep trying!

    Your baby may reject avocado the first time you offer it, but that doesn’t mean she’ll refuse the third or fourth (or fifth) time you try. If a feeding isn’t going well, it’s okay to put away the new food for the day and take a break. But you should bring it out a day or two later, and try again. Experts agree that it often takes a baby a few tries to develop a taste for something new.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What steps do you take to offer a new food to your baby? Any tips for moms who are new to this? Share your advice below!

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Baby Food Recipes: 9 Months

By 9 months, your baby is eating three meals of solids each day, and is starting to eat more and more at each meal. This is an exciting season for your baby, since 9 months marks the time that you can start offering her “real” food and cooking actual meals for her! She’ll still need plenty of baby food, but it’s okay at this point to start offering her bits of table food (mashed or chopped carefully, of course!)

Cereal Recipes

Infant cereal starts become less a part of your baby’s diet at 9 months. Instead, you can start to offer your 9 month old baby other types of grains, like bread, crackers, and pasta. However, you’ll probably still want to offer a few tablespoons of baby cereal to your 9 month old. You can purchase ready-made, powdered cereals at the grocery store, but you can also make your own (for a lot less money!) Visit our Baby Cereal Recipes for step-by-step instructions on how to make your baby’s rice and oatmeal cereal from scratch.

Fruit Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Fruit Recipes to see a sampling of delicious fruit purees and your 9 month old baby is sure to love.  By 9 months, your baby is eating a whole rainbow of fruit, including blueberries, melon, and kiwi!

Vegetable Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Vegetable Recipes for a listing of veggie purees and mashes that’ll keep your 9 month old on the path to healthy, nutritious eating.  At 9 months, your baby’s ready to start eating broccoli and spinach. (Don’t jump to any conclusions; he may love those veggies!)

Protein Recipes

At 9 months, your baby’s probably gobbling up poultry and beans (and possibly eggs, if she’s not allergic.) Now, she’s also ready to try meat (including beef) and even tofu! Visit our Baby Food Protein Recipes for tips on easy ways to prepare meat and tofu.

Meal Recipes

Up to this point, making homemade food for your baby has meant whipping up lots of single-ingredient purees and mashes. Well, it’s time to change that mindset; as a 9 month old, your baby is ready for you to cook “real” food for her! This can mean offering her small amounts of table food (as long as that table food contains ingredients that she’s already tried). It can also mean creating special dishes just for her. 🙂 Visit our 5 Great Recipes page for meal ideas. Your 9 month old will love the broccoli cheddar nuggets and the sweet potato pancakes!

Feeding Fact

We’re way past the smooth, runny purees of just a few months ago; now, your baby should be comfortable with thick, chunky mashes. You can also start offering (very) small pieces of food at this point. Try chopping a chicken breast, or cutting a slice of cheese into tiny cubes. Your baby may not be able to feed himself yet, but you can feed him these tiny pieces.

For ideas that’ll help you create a feeding and sleeping schedule for your 9 month old, check out the recommended 9 month schedule available at BabySleepSite.com.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your 9 month old baby’s favorite foods?  Share your recipe and feeding ideas below!

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Are You Feeding Your Baby Too Much Solid Food?

It’s always nice when a baby who’s just started eating solid foods shows a real appetite for them. As a parent, you know that it feels great to offer your little one healthy purees and then watch as she gobbles them up.

But can that healthy appetite ever be a problem? Can a baby actually eat too much solid food?

In a word, yes.

Remember, for the first year of life, a baby’s primary source of nutrition should be breastmilk and/or formula. It’s just fine to offer solid foods (starting around 5 or 6 months), but solid foods shouldn’t replace breastmilk or formula as a source of nourishment.

In this article, we’ll explore two signs that you may be feeding your baby too much solid food and two easy ways to fix the problem.

2 Signs You’re Feeding Your Baby Too Much Solid Food

  1. Your baby regularly eats more food than is recommended.

    There’s no formula for exactly how much food you should be offering your baby at each meal; rather, its best if you use your baby’s own hunger cues and appetite as a guide.

    But if you find that your baby is routinely eating more than is recommended, you may want to consider offering a bit less food at each sitting. A healthy appetite is a good thing, but not if your baby ends up overeating every day! Check out our Amounts of Solid Food By Age chart to determine appropriate serving sizes for your baby.

  2. Your baby regularly drinks less breastmilk or formula than is recommended.

    This is another sign that you may be offering too much solid food. If you find that your baby is regularly nursing less, or taking less formula during feedings, then you’ll want to take a careful look at how much solid food you’re offering.

    Sometimes, babies who fill up on solids don’t have much room left for breastmilk or formula. And since breastmilk and/or formula is a key part of your baby’s nutrition, it’s vital that they drink plenty of it. Our Amounts of Solid Food By Age chart (referenced above) also includes recommended amounts of breastmilk and formula; check that to see if your baby’s getting enough.

Remember, if your baby has a good appetite for solid foods and eats quite a bit, that’s not necessarily a problem; as long as he’s also nursing or formula-feeding well, and taking in the recommended amounts of breastmilk or formula, all is well.

In addition, if you find that your baby isn’t getting the amounts of breastmilk or formula that she needs, it might not be due to her solids intake. If you know that she’s eating normal amounts of solid foods, then you’ll want to think about other reasons that could be causing her to drink less breastmilk or formula (like illness, or teething).

However, if the two signs listed above seem to go hand-in-hand, then you can be pretty certain that you’re feeding your baby more solid food than is good for her, and it’s causing her to take in less breastmilk or formula than she needs.

Too Much Solid Food and Not Enough Breastmilk/Formula? Ways to Solve the Problem

If you suspect your baby’s consuming too much solid food and not enough breastmilk or formula, there are a two simple steps you can take to fix the situation.

  1. Offer breastmilk or formula before offering solids.

    This one just makes sense, right? When your baby’s at his hungriest, offer him the breast (or the bottle) before you give him a handful of cheerios or a dish of mashed bananas. That‘ll help ensure that he drinks plenty of breastmilk or formula. It’ll also help take the edge off his appetite for solids.

  2. Offer (a little) less solid food.

    Some people suggest stopping solids altogether, and going back to a breastmilk/formula only diet. We generally don’t recommend this strategy, since it’s not a good method for striking a balance between solids and breastmilk or formula.

    Instead, if you suspect you’re offering too much solid food, we recommend cutting back on serving sizes a bit. Simply offer your baby a little less solid food than you normally would. That (in combination with nursing or bottle feeding before you offer solids) should ensure that your baby isn’t eating too much solid food.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

Was your baby a big solids eater? How did you strike a balance between solid food and breastmilk/formula? Share your tips below!

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How Your Baby’s Poop Changes After Starting Solids

Starting solids is a big step for your baby — he’s learning a whole new way of eating, after all! All those new foods affect his every aspect of his digestion, including what ends up in his diapers.

That’s right — we’re talking poop today!

Starting Solids? The Poop Changes!

Before you start your baby on solid foods, it’s best to prepare yourself in advance for the fact that starting solids will probably affect your baby’s poop. The poop will smell worse. The poop may be brightly colored. The poop may appear many times a day. Or, the poop may stop coming altogether.

We repeat — the poop changes.

6 Ways Your Baby’s Poop May Change After Starting Solids

  1. The poop will smell even worse.

    Now, poop never smells great. There’s a reason you won’t find any poop-scented perfumes on the market! But up until the time you start your baby on solids (and this is especially true if baby has been exclusively breastfeeding), the poop probably didn’t stink to high heaven.

    Once you start your baby on solids, though, that’s going to change. Solid food produces smellier poop, and as your baby eats more and more solid food, the poop will only get stinkier. There’s no way around it. Just plan on doing lots of mouth-breathing during diaper changes. 😉

  2. The poop may be colorful.

    Before starting solids, your baby’s poop was probably a consistent yellowish-brown color. Nice and predictable. After starting solids, though, that’ll likely change. Feed your baby plenty of tasty spinach for lunch, and you may very well see green poop at bedtime. Offer a big bowl of yummy steamed carrots for dinner, and you might wake up to a diaper full of bright orange poop the next morning.

    This is nothing to be worried about; brightly-colored poop is normal at this stage. Your baby’s digestive system is still fairly immature and is learning how to process solid foods; as she grows, her poop will change to a more normal color, regardless of what she eats.

  3. The poop may get firmer.

    If your baby’s been on formula, this one may not apply. But if your baby’s been breastfeeding up to this point, you may discover that after starting solids, his poop is firmer and more “shaped”. Breastfed babies typically have runny, liquid-y poop; once they start solids, however, it becomes firmer, more like paste.

  4. The “poop” may look a lot like undigested food.

    This isn’t an issue when you’re feeding your baby smooth purees, but once you start adding some chopped table food into the mix, look out!

    I remember taking my oldest son, when he was just 9 months old, to a dinner buffet. I loaded up a little plate with all kinds of vegetables and felt so proud when my son gobbled them up. The next morning, however, I was a little shocked — the contents of his diaper looked almost exactly like the contents of his plate the night before. The poop didn’t look like like poop at all — it looked like food!

    Turns out I didn’t need to be worried; again, this is just a sign that my son’s digestive system was figuring out how to handle pieces of table food. Over time, as he ate more and more chopped table food, his poop returned to normal.

  5. The poop may start appearing more often.

    By the time you’re ready to start your baby on solid foods, it’s likely that he’s pooping pretty normally (as in once or twice a day). In fact, if he’s being breastfeed exclusively, he may be going a few days in between bowel movements. That’s considered very normal for breastfed babies. And how nice for you, right? Poop-free diapers are so much easier to change. 🙂

    But once you start your baby on solid foods, that may come to an end. For some babies, starting solids means pooping more frequently. We can chalk this up (again) to their immature little digestive systems. As your baby’s systems figure out how to process solid food more efficiently, you’ll find that he returns to more normal amounts of pooping (thank goodness!)

    Note: Diarrhea can be a sign of a food allergy or sensitivity. If you suspect that your baby’s frequent pooping is actually diarrhea, talk to a healthcare provider about possible food allergies and sensitivities.

  6. The poop may disappear altogether.

    Some babies poop WAY more after starting solids. Other babies, though, have the opposite problem: constipation. Constipation often occurs when you offer your baby lots of “binding” foods, like bananas and rice.

    For more information on the signs and symptoms of constipation, as well as ways to alleviate constipation naturally, check out our post on “How to Handle Your Baby’s Constipation.”

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

How has your baby’s poop changed since starting solid foods? Share all the smelly details!

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6 Things To Know Before Starting Your Baby On Solids

We talk a lot around here about starting solids (since it’s the name of our site and all! 😉 ) That’s because it’s our desire to equip all parents with the knowledge they need to give their baby the best possible start to eating solid foods.

We know, however, that for parents (and especially for you first-time parents) the information related to starting your baby on solids can be a LOT to take in! There’s so much to remember, and we know (from personal experience!) that it’s enough to make any parent feel anxious.

In this post, we’ll review six things you need to think about before starting your baby on solid foods. We’ve shared all this information in previous posts, but here, we’ll condense and summarize it for you, in the hopes that it’ll make your life a little easier. Because what parent couldn’t use a healthy does of “easier”, right?

Right.

1. Know When to Start Baby on Solids

We’ve written a lot about when it’s time to start your baby on solids. You can check out our How to Know When to Start Baby on Solids post, as well as our 9 Signs Your Baby Is Ready to Start Solids post.

Short version: It’s best to wait until your baby’s close to 6 months to start feeding your baby solids. That’s based on a recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics, which urges parents to make breastmilk (or formula) their babies’ only source of nutrition for the first 6 months of life.

2. Know How to Start Feeding Baby Solids

Need a little guidance on how to start feeding your baby solid foods? Check out this How To Introduce Your Baby to Solid Foods post (it includes great tips on food sensitivities and allergies). You can also read this How To Feed Your Baby Solids post for a video clip on steps to feeding. Finally, check out our When Do Babies Eat Solid Foods In A Day post for tips on how many meals to offer your baby, and when to offer them.

Short version: Start by offering baby smooth, runny purees. As she gets older, you can offer thicker, lumpier foods with more texture and, eventually, chopped table food. In the beginning, be prepared to be patient — the feeding process will be long and messy, and it may take baby awhile to get the hang of it. Begin by serving one small meal (after baby has nursed or bottle-fed); then, gradually build up to two and then three meals.

3. Know Which Foods Are Best, And How Much Should to Serve

It’s critical that parents know which foods to offer baby at certain ages, and which foods to avoid. Be sure to look over the 8 Most Common Baby First Foods post for recommendations on which foods to serve first. You’ll also want to check out our Types and Amounts of Solid Foods by Age charts to help you decide which foods to offer at each stage of your baby’s development, and how much food you should be serving at each stage.

Short version: Rice cereal is the most common first food, followed by fruits and veggies that are sweet and easy-to-digest. Avoid serving allergenic foods (like milk, nuts, and fish) until baby is 12 months. Begin by offering one or two tablespoons of food each day; then, gradually increase the serving sizes.

4. Know All About Buying Vs. Making Baby Food

Before you start offering your baby solid foods, you’ll want to think about where those solid foods are going to come from. Do you buy baby food? Make it yourself? Read this Should You Make Your Own Baby Food post for tips.

If you do want to dive in and make some of your baby’s food yourself, we’ve got plenty of recipes to get you started. Check out our homemade fruit purees and veggie purees. We also have a complete listing of protein recipes. We’ll even show you how to make baby cereal! And once your baby’s older, we have a sampling of great meal recipes he’s sure to love.

Short version: Buying all of your baby’s food is expensive, but making all of it might not fit into your schedule. Instead, consider buying some and making the rest. Making your baby’s food doesn’t have to be hard; you can simply cook fruits and vegetables you have on hand until they’re soft, and then puree them in your blender. You can serve them immediately, or you can freeze them in small containers for later.

5. Know How Your Baby Might React to Starting Solids

Every baby’s different, so until you start your baby on solids, you won’t know how he’s going to react. Some babies love solids; others aren’t fans at first :). Check out our How Your Baby May React To Starting Solids post for more information.

Short version: Some babies love solids too much; if your baby’s eating tons of food but not nursing or bottle-feeding enough, cut back on the solid food (since breastmilk and/or formula should be your baby’s primary source of nutrition for the first year of life.) But what if your baby seems to hate solids? No worries! There’s no harm in taking a break and trying again later. Finally, starting solids will impact your baby’s digestive system in a big way; your baby may start having diarrhea or constipation.

6. Know Your Baby Feeding Products

We’ve mentioned this a few times in past articles, but it bears repeating: you don’t need fancy gadgets and expensive, trendy tools to feed your baby well. If you have a few bibs, a set of spoons, a couple of (BPA-free) plastic dishes, and a comfy seat for baby, you’re ready to go!

Sometimes, though, it’s worth investing in a few products, especially if they’ll make the baby food making and serving process easier on everyone. Check out our Recommended Products post for a sampling of items we think are worth the investment!

Short version: High-quality bibs, spoons, and dishes are worth the money spent, since you’ll use be using them constantly. A high-quality of high chair can be a good investment, too (especially if it converts into a regular chair, like the Tripp Trapp!) If you’re planning on making lots of your baby’s food at home, buy some good, basic tools (like a steamer basket) as well as some good freezer and storage containers.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

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How To Make Homemade Baby Food: 5 Great Recipes

Once your baby reaches the 8 or 9 month mark, she’s ready to move past single-ingredient purees and on to food combinations.  These combos can be simple, of course (mixing mashed blueberries into oatmeal, stirring pureed broccoli into brown rice, etc.)  Or, if you’re feeling fancy, you can whip up more sophisticated meals.

For information on when to introduce specific fruits into your baby’s diet, along with serving sizes, visit our solid food charts.

Here are 5 nutritious, tasty recipes that we think you’ll love, and that are sure to be both fun to prepare and fun to eat!

Broccoli and Cheddar Cheese Nuggets (introduce after 8 months)

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Yield: 12 - 18 nuggets

Serving Size: approximately 2 nuggets

Broccoli and Cheddar Cheese Nuggets (introduce after 8 months)

This recipe is adapted from Momtastic’s Wholesome Baby Food.

Ingredients

  • 1 16-oz  package frozen broccoli, cooked, drained, and chopped

  • 1 cup seasoned bread crumbs (You can also use powdered baby cereal. See our homemade baby cereal post (LINK TO POST) for information on how to make your own cereal powders.)
  • 
1 ½ cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • 3 large eggs (It’s now considered safe to offer babies both egg yolks and whites around 8 or 9 months. Ask your pediatrician if you’re uncertain about offering eggs at this age.)

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 375 and lightly coat a baking sheet with olive oil.
  2. Combine all remaining ingredients and mix well. Add seasonings if you  like - garlic powder, pepper, extra basil, & oregano, for example.
  3. Shape mixture into nuggets or fun shapes such as squares, “squiggles”, etc. Place on greased baking tray. Bake for 15 minutes; flip nuggets over, and bake for another 5 - 10 minutes (20-25 minutes total baking time.)
  4. Serve warm.

Notes

These are great for babies who are able to chew and mash food with their gums. They’re also great for toddlers and big kids -- they’re like vegetarian chicken nuggets!

 

Sweet Potato Pancakes (introduce after 8 months)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

Yield: 10-12 pancakes

Serving Size: 1-2 pancakes

Sweet Potato Pancakes (introduce after 8 months)

This recipe was originally published on NurtureBaby.com.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of white whole wheat flour (or substitute 1 cup all purpose flour and 1 cup whole wheat flour)
  • 3 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 large sweet potato - baked, peeled and pureed (or 1 cup prepared sweet potato puree)
  • 2 cups milk
  • ¼ cup melted butter
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 tbsp. brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp. vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. In large bowl, combine first five (dry) ingredients together and set aside.
  2.  In a mixing bowl, combine sweet potato, milk, butter, eggs and sugar and vanilla and mix until smooth. Slowly add dry ingredients to mixing bowl; mix until just combined. (A few lumps are OK; over mixing will make the pancakes tough.)
  3. Pour ¼ cup portions of batter onto greased skillet. Cook on medium heat and flip pancakes when bubbles form on the surface. Pancakes should be a golden brown color.
  4. Serve immediately, or freeze for later consumption. If freezing, place sheet of parchment paper between each pancake and store in zip-tight freezer bag. Store in freezer for up to 3 months.

Notes

We promise, your baby won’t have a clue he’s eating veggies for breakfast! These taste a lot like pumpkin pie, meaning that breakfast will feel more like dessert.

 

Hawaiian Pork and Rice Dinner (introduce after 9 months)

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 22 minutes

Total Time: 27 minutes

Yield: approximately 2-3 cups

Serving Size: approximately 1/2 cup

Hawaiian Pork and Rice Dinner (introduce after 9 months)

This recipe is adapted from homemade-baby-food-recipes.com.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup ground pork
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup rice, uncooked
  • 1/2 cup peaches, peeled and sliced (fresh preferred)
  • 1/4 cup pineapple chunks

Instructions

  1. Bring pork and 1 cup of the water to boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 2 minutes.
  2. Drain, refrigerating reserved liquid.
  3. Add rice, remaining 1 cup water, peaches and pineapple to meat. Simmer 15 minutes.
  4. Remove any grease from reserved liquid and return juices to pot.
  5. Continue to cook mixture for another 5 minutes. Mash or puree before serving.

Notes

With flavors of peach and pineapple, this dinner offers baby a taste of the tropics!

 

Italian Green Veggie Pasta (introduce after 11 months)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

Yield: approximately 1 cup sauce

Serving Size: approximately 1/2 - 3/4 cup pasta tossed with sauc

Italian Green Veggie Pasta (introduce after 11 months)

This recipe was originally published on Weelicious.com

Ingredients

  • 1 Medium Zucchini, sliced

  • 1 Cup Broccoli Florets

  • 1/4 Cup Tomato or Marinara Sauce

  • 2 Tbsp Parmesan Cheese, grated
  • Prepared pasta (Small pasta shapes are best for babies who are ready for finger-feeding.)

Instructions

  1. Place the zucchini and broccoli florets in a steamer pot over boiling water, steam for 5 minutes and allow to cool.

  2. Place all of the ingredients in a food processor and puree until smooth.

  3. Toss with prepared pasta. Serve.

Notes

Even if your baby isn’t normally a fan of broccoli or zucchini, we’re betting she’ll gobble up this pasta. Combining these veggies with tomato sauce and cheese makes them event tastier!

 

Whole Wheat Chocolate Muffins (introduce after 11 months)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 22 minutes

Total Time: 32 minutes

Yield: approximately 12 muffins

Serving Size: 1 muffin

Whole Wheat Chocolate Muffins (introduce after 11 months)

This recipe was originally published on NurtureBaby.com.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup 100% whole wheat flour
  • ¾ cup All-Purpose flour
  • ¼ tsp. kosher salt
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • 1-¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 3 ounces unsweetened chocolate, melted
  • ½ cup plain or vanilla Greek yogurt* (2% or full fat recommended)
  • ½ cup hot water
  • *Greek yogurt is recommended, as it has a much richer consistency. If you can’t find Greek yogurt, you can substitute with sour cream.

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Mix flours, salt, and baking soda together in a medium-sized bowl and set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, combine oil, sugar, eggs and vanilla and whisk until golden brown. Add melted chocolate and stir until well blended.
  4. Add flour mixture, alternating with yogurt. Stir just until combined and then add hot water a little bit at a time.
  5. Mix thoroughly and dole into lined cupcake tins.
  6. Bake for 19-22 minutes and make sure not to over bake, as the cakes will dry out.
  7. Eat these warm as muffins, or frost with your favorite frosting.

Notes

Babies cannot live on fruits and veggies alone! Sometimes, a little dessert is necessary. To give your baby the healthiest start, avoid serving him foods with lots of sugar until he's a bit older; wait until 11 or 12 months to offer him these chocolatey muffins.

For tips on how to safely and conveniently store your homemade fruit purees, visit our food storage page.

Want to make the baby food making and serving even easier? Check out our list of recommended products for tools that’ll make baby feeding a breeze!

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your baby’s favorite meals?  Share your recipes below!

 

 

 

 

 

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Baby Food Recipes: 8 Months

By 8 months, solid food is a regular part of your baby’s routine. She’s probably having two or three solid feeds each day, and she’s tasted quite a variety of fruits and vegetables! Now, she’s ready to start eating small amounts of meat and dairy products.

Cereal Recipes

Infant cereal will still be one of the primary foods your 8 month old eats each day. You can purchase ready-made, powdered cereals at the grocery store, but you can also make your own (for a lot less money!) Visit our Baby Cereal Recipes for step-by-step instructions on how to make your baby’s rice and oatmeal cereal from scratch.

Fruit Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Fruit Recipes to see a sampling of delicious fruit purees and your 8 month old baby is sure to love.  By 8 months, your baby can enjoy some tasty fruits, including peaches, nectarines, plus, mangos, and even papayas!

Vegetable Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Vegetable Recipes for a listing of veggie purees and mashes that’ll keep your 8 month old on the path to healthy, nutritious eating.  At 8 months, your baby gets to enjoy two veggie “classics”: peas and carrots. 🙂

Protein Recipes

At 7 months, your baby wasn’t quite ready for meat, so we stuck to offering beans. But your 8 month old is ready to start eating small amounts of poultry; she’s also ready to eat eggs*. Visit our Baby Food Protein Recipes for simple poultry recipes.

Feeding Fact

Your baby’s ready to move past single-ingredient meals at 8 months, so it’s time to get creative! Mix those purees and mashes to create complete meals for your 8 month old. At this point, you can stop offering your baby smooth purees and begin to feed him chunkier, thicker mashes. This’ll help him practice using his gums to mash food, a key step in learning how to chew.

For ideas that’ll help you create a feeding and sleeping schedule for your 8 month old, check out the recommended 8 month schedule, available at BabySleepSite.com.

*Eggs are considered a highly allergenic food; check with your baby’s doctor before offering eggs.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your 8 month old baby’s favorite foods?  Share your recipe and feeding ideas below!

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