Tag Archives: making homemade baby food

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Baby Food Recipes: 11 Months

Time to face facts: your 11 month old baby is barely a baby anymore! Remember those early days of feeding your little ones drippy, runny purees and watching her spit them back at you? How far we’ve come! Now, your 11 month old should be getting better and better at feeding herself finger foods. In fact, you may have started offering her entire finger food meals! And your baby doesn’t need those single-ingredient dishes anymore; now she’s completely ready to tackle real food, with lots of ingredients.

Cereal Recipes

Infant cereal is a very small part of your 11 month old baby’s diet now. Instead, your 11 month old baby will be getting the grain servings he needs from foods like bread, crackers, and pasta. You may still want to offer your 11 month old a small serving of infant cereal every now and then, however. You can purchase ready-made, powdered cereals at the grocery store, but you can also make your own (for a lot less money!) Visit our Baby Cereal Recipes for step-by-step instructions on how to make your baby’s rice and oatmeal cereal from scratch.

Fruit Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Fruit Recipes to see a sampling of delicious fruit purees and your 9 month old baby is sure to love.  At 11 months old, your baby can eat all kinds of fruits, including the strawberries and tomatoes that you’ve probably been waiting to offer. (And yes — tomatoes are fruit!)

Vegetable Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Vegetable Recipes for a listing of veggie purees and mashes that’ll keep your 9 month old on the path to healthy, nutritious eating.  Your 11 month old can now eat all kinds of veggies, including corn.

Protein Recipes

By 11 month old, your baby is eating beans, eggs, meat, and poultry, and maybe even tofu! Now that he’s older, he’s finally ready to sample fish and nuts. Visit our Baby Food Protein Recipes for tips on easy ways to prepare white fish.

Meal Recipes

Your 11 month old may be getting bored with those single-ingredient means; she may start showing a preference for real food. You can continue to offer her more and more table food; you can also continue creating special dishes just for her. 🙂 Visit our 5 Great Recipes page for meal ideas. We’re betting your 11 month old won’t be able to get enough of the whole wheat chocolate muffins!

Feeding Fact

Get ready for a transition — it’s time for your baby to stop relying on you to feed him every bit and to instead learn to feed himself (that is, if he hasn’t already!) Whenever possible, encourage your baby to feed himself small pieces of finger food. Consider making one or more meals “finger food meals” to give your baby plenty of practice at self-feeding.

Is your baby already a finger-feeding expert? If you’re feeling brave, give your baby a small plastic dish of food, a spoon, and let her practice spoon feeding. Try something like pudding or yogurt, which’ll stick to a spoon easily. Take note: this experiment will be less painful for you if your baby’s wearing only a diaper (no messy clothing to wash later!) and if you put down a splash mat over your nice floor 🙂

For ideas that’ll help you create a feeding and sleeping schedule for your 10 month old, check out the recommended 11 month schedule available at BabySleepSite.com.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your 11 month old baby’s favorite foods?  Share your recipe and feeding ideas below!

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Baby Food Recipes: 10 Months

Your 10 month old baby is probably a “solids pro” by now! He’s tackled all kinds of tastes and textures, and has started enjoying some real meals. By 10 months, your baby will be ready to start eating more and more table food. You can start chopping or slicing the foods you’re eating at mealtime and offering them to your baby (provided the foods you’re eating aren’t too crunchy or chewy, and aren’t allergenic.) This means you’ll need to make fewer purees and mashes to freeze.

Cereal Recipes

Infant cereal starts become less a part of your baby’s diet at 10 months. Instead, you can start to offer your 10 month old baby other types of grains, like bread, crackers, and pasta. However, you’ll probably still want to offer a few tablespoons of baby cereal to your 10 month old. You can purchase ready-made, powdered cereals at the grocery store, but you can also make your own (for a lot less money!) Visit our Baby Cereal Recipes for step-by-step instructions on how to make your baby’s rice and oatmeal cereal from scratch.

Fruit Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Fruit Recipes to see a sampling of delicious fruit purees and your 9 month old baby is sure to love.  By 10 months, your baby is eating a whole rainbow of fruit, including blueberries, melon, and kiwi!

Vegetable Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Vegetable Recipes for a listing of veggie purees and mashes that’ll keep your 10 month old on the path to healthy, nutritious eating.  At 10 months, your baby’s ready to start eating broccoli and spinach. (Don’t jump to any conclusions; he may love those veggies!)

Protein Recipes

At 10 months, your baby’s probably gobbling up poultry and beans (and possibly eggs, if she’s not allergic.) Now, she’s also ready to try meat (including beef) and even tofu! Visit our Baby Food Protein Recipes for tips on easy ways to prepare meat and tofu.

Meal Recipes

Up to this point, making homemade food for your baby has meant whipping up lots of single-ingredient purees and mashes. Well, it’s time to change that mindset; as a 10 month old, your baby is ready for you to cook “real” food for her! This can mean offering her small amounts of table food (as long as that table food contains ingredients that she’s already tried). It can also mean creating special dishes just for her. 🙂 Visit our 5 Great Recipes page for meal ideas. Your 10 month old will love the broccoli cheddar nuggets, the sweet potato pancakes, and the Hawaiian pork and rice dinner!

Feeding Fact

We’re way past the smooth, runny purees of just a few months ago; now, your baby should be comfortable with thick, chunky mashes. You can also start offering (very) small pieces of food at this point. Try chopping a chicken breast, or cutting a slice of cheese into tiny cubes. Your baby may not be able to feed himself yet, but you can feed him these tiny pieces.

 

For ideas that’ll help you create a feeding and sleeping schedule for your 10 month old, check out the recommended 10 month schedule available at BabySleepSite.com.

 

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your 10 month old baby’s favorite foods?  Share your recipe and feeding ideas below!


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Baby Food Recipes: 9 Months

By 9 months, your baby is eating three meals of solids each day, and is starting to eat more and more at each meal. This is an exciting season for your baby, since 9 months marks the time that you can start offering her “real” food and cooking actual meals for her! She’ll still need plenty of baby food, but it’s okay at this point to start offering her bits of table food (mashed or chopped carefully, of course!)

Cereal Recipes

Infant cereal starts become less a part of your baby’s diet at 9 months. Instead, you can start to offer your 9 month old baby other types of grains, like bread, crackers, and pasta. However, you’ll probably still want to offer a few tablespoons of baby cereal to your 9 month old. You can purchase ready-made, powdered cereals at the grocery store, but you can also make your own (for a lot less money!) Visit our Baby Cereal Recipes for step-by-step instructions on how to make your baby’s rice and oatmeal cereal from scratch.

Fruit Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Fruit Recipes to see a sampling of delicious fruit purees and your 9 month old baby is sure to love.  By 9 months, your baby is eating a whole rainbow of fruit, including blueberries, melon, and kiwi!

Vegetable Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Vegetable Recipes for a listing of veggie purees and mashes that’ll keep your 9 month old on the path to healthy, nutritious eating.  At 9 months, your baby’s ready to start eating broccoli and spinach. (Don’t jump to any conclusions; he may love those veggies!)

Protein Recipes

At 9 months, your baby’s probably gobbling up poultry and beans (and possibly eggs, if she’s not allergic.) Now, she’s also ready to try meat (including beef) and even tofu! Visit our Baby Food Protein Recipes for tips on easy ways to prepare meat and tofu.

Meal Recipes

Up to this point, making homemade food for your baby has meant whipping up lots of single-ingredient purees and mashes. Well, it’s time to change that mindset; as a 9 month old, your baby is ready for you to cook “real” food for her! This can mean offering her small amounts of table food (as long as that table food contains ingredients that she’s already tried). It can also mean creating special dishes just for her. 🙂 Visit our 5 Great Recipes page for meal ideas. Your 9 month old will love the broccoli cheddar nuggets and the sweet potato pancakes!

Feeding Fact

We’re way past the smooth, runny purees of just a few months ago; now, your baby should be comfortable with thick, chunky mashes. You can also start offering (very) small pieces of food at this point. Try chopping a chicken breast, or cutting a slice of cheese into tiny cubes. Your baby may not be able to feed himself yet, but you can feed him these tiny pieces.

For ideas that’ll help you create a feeding and sleeping schedule for your 9 month old, check out the recommended 9 month schedule available at BabySleepSite.com.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your 9 month old baby’s favorite foods?  Share your recipe and feeding ideas below!

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How To Make Homemade Baby Food: 5 Great Recipes

Once your baby reaches the 8 or 9 month mark, she’s ready to move past single-ingredient purees and on to food combinations.  These combos can be simple, of course (mixing mashed blueberries into oatmeal, stirring pureed broccoli into brown rice, etc.)  Or, if you’re feeling fancy, you can whip up more sophisticated meals.

For information on when to introduce specific fruits into your baby’s diet, along with serving sizes, visit our solid food charts.

Here are 5 nutritious, tasty recipes that we think you’ll love, and that are sure to be both fun to prepare and fun to eat!

Broccoli and Cheddar Cheese Nuggets (introduce after 8 months)

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Yield: 12 - 18 nuggets

Serving Size: approximately 2 nuggets

Broccoli and Cheddar Cheese Nuggets (introduce after 8 months)

This recipe is adapted from Momtastic’s Wholesome Baby Food.

Ingredients

  • 1 16-oz  package frozen broccoli, cooked, drained, and chopped

  • 1 cup seasoned bread crumbs (You can also use powdered baby cereal. See our homemade baby cereal post (LINK TO POST) for information on how to make your own cereal powders.)
  • 
1 ½ cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • 3 large eggs (It’s now considered safe to offer babies both egg yolks and whites around 8 or 9 months. Ask your pediatrician if you’re uncertain about offering eggs at this age.)

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 375 and lightly coat a baking sheet with olive oil.
  2. Combine all remaining ingredients and mix well. Add seasonings if you  like - garlic powder, pepper, extra basil, & oregano, for example.
  3. Shape mixture into nuggets or fun shapes such as squares, “squiggles”, etc. Place on greased baking tray. Bake for 15 minutes; flip nuggets over, and bake for another 5 - 10 minutes (20-25 minutes total baking time.)
  4. Serve warm.

Notes

These are great for babies who are able to chew and mash food with their gums. They’re also great for toddlers and big kids -- they’re like vegetarian chicken nuggets!

 

Sweet Potato Pancakes (introduce after 8 months)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

Yield: 10-12 pancakes

Serving Size: 1-2 pancakes

Sweet Potato Pancakes (introduce after 8 months)

This recipe was originally published on NurtureBaby.com.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of white whole wheat flour (or substitute 1 cup all purpose flour and 1 cup whole wheat flour)
  • 3 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 large sweet potato - baked, peeled and pureed (or 1 cup prepared sweet potato puree)
  • 2 cups milk
  • ¼ cup melted butter
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 tbsp. brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp. vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. In large bowl, combine first five (dry) ingredients together and set aside.
  2.  In a mixing bowl, combine sweet potato, milk, butter, eggs and sugar and vanilla and mix until smooth. Slowly add dry ingredients to mixing bowl; mix until just combined. (A few lumps are OK; over mixing will make the pancakes tough.)
  3. Pour ¼ cup portions of batter onto greased skillet. Cook on medium heat and flip pancakes when bubbles form on the surface. Pancakes should be a golden brown color.
  4. Serve immediately, or freeze for later consumption. If freezing, place sheet of parchment paper between each pancake and store in zip-tight freezer bag. Store in freezer for up to 3 months.

Notes

We promise, your baby won’t have a clue he’s eating veggies for breakfast! These taste a lot like pumpkin pie, meaning that breakfast will feel more like dessert.

 

Hawaiian Pork and Rice Dinner (introduce after 9 months)

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 22 minutes

Total Time: 27 minutes

Yield: approximately 2-3 cups

Serving Size: approximately 1/2 cup

Hawaiian Pork and Rice Dinner (introduce after 9 months)

This recipe is adapted from homemade-baby-food-recipes.com.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup ground pork
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup rice, uncooked
  • 1/2 cup peaches, peeled and sliced (fresh preferred)
  • 1/4 cup pineapple chunks

Instructions

  1. Bring pork and 1 cup of the water to boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 2 minutes.
  2. Drain, refrigerating reserved liquid.
  3. Add rice, remaining 1 cup water, peaches and pineapple to meat. Simmer 15 minutes.
  4. Remove any grease from reserved liquid and return juices to pot.
  5. Continue to cook mixture for another 5 minutes. Mash or puree before serving.

Notes

With flavors of peach and pineapple, this dinner offers baby a taste of the tropics!

 

Italian Green Veggie Pasta (introduce after 11 months)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

Yield: approximately 1 cup sauce

Serving Size: approximately 1/2 - 3/4 cup pasta tossed with sauc

Italian Green Veggie Pasta (introduce after 11 months)

This recipe was originally published on Weelicious.com

Ingredients

  • 1 Medium Zucchini, sliced

  • 1 Cup Broccoli Florets

  • 1/4 Cup Tomato or Marinara Sauce

  • 2 Tbsp Parmesan Cheese, grated
  • Prepared pasta (Small pasta shapes are best for babies who are ready for finger-feeding.)

Instructions

  1. Place the zucchini and broccoli florets in a steamer pot over boiling water, steam for 5 minutes and allow to cool.

  2. Place all of the ingredients in a food processor and puree until smooth.

  3. Toss with prepared pasta. Serve.

Notes

Even if your baby isn’t normally a fan of broccoli or zucchini, we’re betting she’ll gobble up this pasta. Combining these veggies with tomato sauce and cheese makes them event tastier!

 

Whole Wheat Chocolate Muffins (introduce after 11 months)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 22 minutes

Total Time: 32 minutes

Yield: approximately 12 muffins

Serving Size: 1 muffin

Whole Wheat Chocolate Muffins (introduce after 11 months)

This recipe was originally published on NurtureBaby.com.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup 100% whole wheat flour
  • ¾ cup All-Purpose flour
  • ¼ tsp. kosher salt
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • 1-¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 3 ounces unsweetened chocolate, melted
  • ½ cup plain or vanilla Greek yogurt* (2% or full fat recommended)
  • ½ cup hot water
  • *Greek yogurt is recommended, as it has a much richer consistency. If you can’t find Greek yogurt, you can substitute with sour cream.

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Mix flours, salt, and baking soda together in a medium-sized bowl and set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, combine oil, sugar, eggs and vanilla and whisk until golden brown. Add melted chocolate and stir until well blended.
  4. Add flour mixture, alternating with yogurt. Stir just until combined and then add hot water a little bit at a time.
  5. Mix thoroughly and dole into lined cupcake tins.
  6. Bake for 19-22 minutes and make sure not to over bake, as the cakes will dry out.
  7. Eat these warm as muffins, or frost with your favorite frosting.

Notes

Babies cannot live on fruits and veggies alone! Sometimes, a little dessert is necessary. To give your baby the healthiest start, avoid serving him foods with lots of sugar until he's a bit older; wait until 11 or 12 months to offer him these chocolatey muffins.

For tips on how to safely and conveniently store your homemade fruit purees, visit our food storage page.

Want to make the baby food making and serving even easier? Check out our list of recommended products for tools that’ll make baby feeding a breeze!

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your baby’s favorite meals?  Share your recipes below!

 

 

 

 

 

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Baby Food Recipes: 8 Months

By 8 months, solid food is a regular part of your baby’s routine. She’s probably having two or three solid feeds each day, and she’s tasted quite a variety of fruits and vegetables! Now, she’s ready to start eating small amounts of meat and dairy products.

Cereal Recipes

Infant cereal will still be one of the primary foods your 8 month old eats each day. You can purchase ready-made, powdered cereals at the grocery store, but you can also make your own (for a lot less money!) Visit our Baby Cereal Recipes for step-by-step instructions on how to make your baby’s rice and oatmeal cereal from scratch.

Fruit Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Fruit Recipes to see a sampling of delicious fruit purees and your 8 month old baby is sure to love.  By 8 months, your baby can enjoy some tasty fruits, including peaches, nectarines, plus, mangos, and even papayas!

Vegetable Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Vegetable Recipes for a listing of veggie purees and mashes that’ll keep your 8 month old on the path to healthy, nutritious eating.  At 8 months, your baby gets to enjoy two veggie “classics”: peas and carrots. 🙂

Protein Recipes

At 7 months, your baby wasn’t quite ready for meat, so we stuck to offering beans. But your 8 month old is ready to start eating small amounts of poultry; she’s also ready to eat eggs*. Visit our Baby Food Protein Recipes for simple poultry recipes.

Feeding Fact

Your baby’s ready to move past single-ingredient meals at 8 months, so it’s time to get creative! Mix those purees and mashes to create complete meals for your 8 month old. At this point, you can stop offering your baby smooth purees and begin to feed him chunkier, thicker mashes. This’ll help him practice using his gums to mash food, a key step in learning how to chew.

For ideas that’ll help you create a feeding and sleeping schedule for your 8 month old, check out the recommended 8 month schedule, available at BabySleepSite.com.

*Eggs are considered a highly allergenic food; check with your baby’s doctor before offering eggs.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your 8 month old baby’s favorite foods?  Share your recipe and feeding ideas below!

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Baby Food Recipes: 7 Months

By 7 months, your baby’s becoming used to eating solids. You may notice that mealtime is getting a little neater, as your baby figure out how to slurp food from his spoon, and how to keep it in his mouth (instead of spitting it all over you!) By 7 months, your baby is also ready to start experiencing a wider variety of foods.

Cereal Recipes

Infant cereal will still be one of the primary foods your 7 month old eats each day. You can purchase ready-made, powdered cereals at the grocery store, but you can also make your own (for a lot less money) Visit our Baby Cereal Recipes for step-by-step instructions on how to make your baby’s rice and oatmeal cereal from scratch.

Fruit Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Fruit Recipes to see a sampling of delicious fruit purees and your 7 month old baby is sure to love.  By 7 months, your baby is ready to try some tasty fruits, including peaches, nectarines, plus, mangos, and even papayas.

Vegetable Recipes

Visit our Baby Food Vegetable Recipes for a listing of veggie purees and mashes that’ll give your 7 month old baby the healthy start he needs.  At 7 months, your baby gets to start eating two veggie “classics”: peas and carrots. 🙂

Protein Recipes

Your 7 month old baby isn’t quite ready for meat yet, but she is ready for beans. Visit our Baby Food Protein Recipes for tips on how to create delectable, protein-packed bean dishes that your baby will gobble up, including lentil stew, baked beans, and hummus.

Feeding Fact

Continue to feed your 7 month old mostly single-ingredient meals (although you can begin mixing together foods that your baby’s already familiar with.) Your purees can be a bit less runny and smooth at this point. Slowly start to thicken purees with powdered cereal, and begin offering some chunkier textures. Just be sure you monitor your baby closely during feeding time, to prevent choking!

For ideas that’ll help you create a feeding and sleeping schedule for your 7 month old, check out the recommended 7 month schedule, available at BabySleepSite.com.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your 7 month old baby’s favorite foods?  Share your recipe and feeding ideas below!


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How To Make Homemade Baby Food: Proteins

Once your baby’s gotten used to eating fruits and vegetables, it’s time to start thinking about adding proteins into her diet. Keep in mind that for the first year of your baby’s life, breastmilk and/or formula will be her main source of protein. But starting around 7 months, you can begin adding in other protein sources, too.

Proteins are a key part of your baby’s diet, since they’ll help him grow and develop properly. And introducing protein into your baby’s diet will help him experience some new textures and flavors — always exciting!

For information on when to introduce specific fruits into your baby’s diet, along with serving sizes, visit our solid food charts.

Ready? Time to whip up some proteins!

Simple Meat and Poultry Recipe (introduce poultry at 8 months; introduce meat at 9-10 months)

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Yield: approximately 1 cup

Serving Size: 1-3 Tablespoons

Simple Meat and Poultry Recipe (introduce poultry at 8 months; introduce meat at 9-10 months)

Ingredients

  • 3/4 - 1 cup cooked meat (chicken, turkey, beef, or pork), cut into small chunks
  • 1/4 cup water (if you’ll be pureeing the meat)

Instructions

  1. If your baby’s familiar with finger-food, you can simply serve her the small chunks of meat and let her self-feed.
  2. If your baby isn’t quite ready for finger-food, put the chunks into a food processor and mix to desired consistency. For older babies, the meat can be ground; for younger babies, add water and puree to a thinner consistency.

Notes

When cooking meats for your baby, be sure that they are well-cooked. Never feed your baby rare or undercooked meats.

Simple Egg Recipes (introduce at 8 months)

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 20 minutes

Serving Size: 1/2 - 1 egg

Simple Egg Recipes (introduce at 8 months)

Ingredients

  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 - 2 cups water (if boiling egg)

Instructions

    For hard-boiled eggs:
  1. Boil the egg until firm (16 minutes for large egg; 19 minutes for extra-large egg). Allow to cool completely.
  2. Carefully peel the shell from the egg. Mash, dice, or slice egg, depending on the age of your baby.
  3. For scrambled eggs:
  4. Crack egg into a bowl and beat.
  5. Grease a small sautee pan and heat over medium heat.
  6. Add egg to hot pan; scramble until egg is set.
  7. Allow to cool before serving to your baby

Notes

Eggs are a highly allergenic food, and experts used to recommend waiting to introduce them into a baby’s diet until 12 months (or, at least, waiting to introduce egg whites, since that’s the “allergenic” part of the egg. Now, however, health experts suggest introducing them earlier, since there’s no link between delaying eggs and preventing egg allergies. If your family has a history of egg allergies, however, ask your doctor if you should wait and start eggs later.

Simple Fish Recipe (introduce at 11-12 months)

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

Serving Size: approximately 2-3 servings

Simple Fish Recipe (introduce at 11-12 months)

Ingredients

  • 1 fillet of boneless whitefish (like cod, haddock, pollock, or tilapia)
  • 1/4 cup water (if you’ll be pureeing the fish)

Instructions

  1. Bake, broil, or grill the fillet, until fish is done and flakes easily.
  2. If your baby’s familiar with finger-food, you can simply flake the fish and serve it to him that way.
  3. For younger babies, grind the fish in a food processor. You can leave it ground or add in a bit of water and puree it to an ever thinner consistency.

Of course, animal products like the ones listed above aren’t the only sources of protein. If that were the case, vegetarians wouldn’t stand a chance! No, there are plenty of vegetable products that are packed with protein, too. Beans, legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds, and soy products are all great sources of protein.

Simple Lentil Recipe (introduce at 7-8 months)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Yield: approximately 1/2 - 3/4 cup

Serving Size: 2-4 Tablespoons

Simple Lentil Recipe (introduce at 7-8 months)

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup lentils (red, green, or brown)
  • 3/4 cup water or low-sodium stock (vegetable, beef, or chicken)

Instructions

  1. Sort lentils, removing any discolored/damaged ones. Then, rinse lentils.
  2. Bring water or stock to a boil. Add lentils.
  3. Cook until tender (15 minutes for red lentils, 20 minutes for green lentils, or 30 minutes for brown lentils).

Notes

Brown lentils are typically the easiest to find in the grocery store. However, red and green are also good choices. Red in particular are great for babies -- they’re naturally sweet, and they cook fast.

Simple Bean Recipe (introduce at 7-8 months)

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Yield: 1/2 cup

Serving Size: 2-4 Tablespoons

Simple Bean Recipe (introduce at 7-8 months)

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup soft, cooked beans (use dried or canned -- see below for details)

Instructions

  1. If using dried beans, cook according to package directions. Be sure to sort and rinse dried beans carefully. If using canned beans, drain and rinse.
  2. If your baby’s familiar with finger-food, you can simply serve her the beans and let her self-feed.
  3. For younger babies, mash beans gently. You can also place beans in a food processor, add water, and puree.

Notes

If you plan to use dried beans, allow plenty of prep and cooking time. Dried beans must be soaked overnight and then boiled for at least an hour before they're soft enough for baby to eat.

Homemade Hummus Recipe (introduce at 7-8 months)

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Yield: approximately 1 1/2 cups

Serving Size: 2-4 Tablespoons

Homemade Hummus Recipe (introduce at 7-8 months)

This recipe comes from www.homemade-baby-food.com

Ingredients

  • 1 - 1 1/2 cups chickpeas or garbanzo beans
  • 2 tbsp. tahini paste*
  • 2-3 T lemon juice*
  • 2 cloves garlic*
  • 2-3 T olive oil
  • *For younger babies, simply leave these ingredients out and puree chickpeas with oil.

Instructions

  1. Drain the beans (if using canned). If using dried, follow package directions to prepare and cook beans. Be sure to sort and rinse dried beans carefully.
  2. Puree all ingredients in a food processor.
  3. Serve this to younger babies as is; for older babies, spread this on crackers or bread.

Notes

If you're using dried beans, be sure to allow plenty of prep and cooking time. Dried beans must be soaked overnight and cooked for at least an hour before they're soft enough for baby.

Simple Tofu Recipes (introduce at 9-10 months)

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Serving Size: 1-2 ounces of tofu

Simple Tofu Recipes (introduce at 9-10 months)

Ingredients

  • 1 package of tofu (silken, soft, firm, or extra-firm, depending on which recipe you use)

Instructions

    For self-feeding babies:
  1. Cut tofu (firm or extra-firm) into small cubes and offer them to your baby.
  2. For mashed tofu mixtures:
  3. Mash tofu (soft) into desired consistency.
  4. Stir into fruit or vegetable purees.
  5. For tofu smoothies:
  6. Blend silken tofu with fruit juices and purees to create a delicious, protein-packed drink for your baby.

Notes

Tofu is made from soy, and soy tends to be a common allergen. If soy allergies run in your family, ask your doctor about waiting to introduce soy to your baby.

Protein mashes and purees are just fine on their own, of course. But stirring in some other ingredients can make for a delicious and complete meal! For example, toss chicken cubes with a vegetable puree and serve alongside brown rice. And it’s not just vegetable purees that combine well with meat — fruits can, too! Pork and applesauce? Tilapia with pureed mangoes? Sounds good to us!

For tips on how to safely and conveniently store your baby’s homemade proteins, visit our food storage page.

Want to make the baby food making and serving even easier? Check out our list of recommended products for tools that’ll make baby feeding a breeze!

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What are your baby’s favorite proteins? Any favorite protein recipes? Share them below!

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Should You Make Your Own Baby Food?

Make Your Own Baby Food

Now that you’ve started your baby on solid foods, you’re probably realizing that you have a few choices: you can either buy your baby’s pureed food at the grocery store, or you can make it yourself . Which option is best? This article will explore the pros and cons of buying pre-made baby food and making your baby’s food yourself.

Buying Pre-Made Baby Food: The PROS and CONS

THE PROS

  • It’s convenient. Jarred baby food offers a convenience factor that homemade baby food simply doesn’t. Sure, there are gadgets out there that make the process of producing homemade baby food much simpler (Baby Bullet, anyone? I personally used a regular blender and ice cube trays) but nothing’s faster and easier than twisting the lid off a jar of pre-made baby food.
  • It stores and travels well. Another point in favor of jarred baby food — it’s easy to store and easy to carry. Jarred baby food doesn’t need to be refrigerated (or frozen and then defrosted); it easily keeps on a pantry shelf. And if baby needs to eat on the go, jarred baby food can be a great option, as it’s so portable.
  • They’re healthier now than they used to be. Decades ago, jarred baby food contained added thickeners and preservatives that made them less healthy options. Today, this is no longer the case — most jarred baby food is 100% natural and preservative-free.

THE CONS

  • It’s pricey! At around $.30/ounce (on average), jarred baby food definitely isn’t cheap. And when you factor in your baby’s growing appetite, and the fact that she’s only going to eat more as she gets older, the prospect of feeding her jarred food seems expensive indeed.
  • It limits your food options. You’ll find jarred versions of the most common baby foods — carrots, peas, sweet potatoes, bananas, pears, etc. But once you get into some of the less common foods (apricots, blueberries, spinach) it’ll be much harder to find beginner, pureed versions and sometimes there are only mixed fruit varieties that may not be all that appealing to your baby.  And if you’re committed to eating organically, your options are even more limited. While some baby food companies have organic versions of their product, the organic options are not quite as abundant. Organic baby foods often cost more as well.
  • You have no control over the food-making process. It’s a fact that steaming fruits and vegetables is a better, healthier option than boiling them (as it lets them retain more of their vital nutrients). But when you buy jarred baby food, you really can’t be sure how the food you’re about to feed your little one has been cooked.

Making Your Own Baby Food: The PROS and CONS

THE PROS

  • It’s cheap! A small jar of pureed peas costs around $.30 per ounce. A one-pound bag of frozen peas costs around $.07 or $.08 per ounce. Cheaper to make your own pureed peas? You bet! If you want to save your hard-earned cash, making your own baby food is a great way to do it.
  • The sky’s the limit. When you make your baby’s food yourself, your food options are practically limitless. Pureed strawberries are hard (or maybe even impossible) to find in a baby food jar, but they’re easy to make at home. And as your baby grows and is ready for more complex food combinations, making his food gets even easier: simply toss a bit of whatever your family’s having for dinner into the food processor and mash it up! This is also a great way to expose your baby (when he’s older) to the tastes and textures of real table food.
  • You have complete control. Want your baby to eat only local, organic foods? When you make your own baby food, you can ensure that happens. What’s more, you have total control over how your baby’s food is cooked and what’s added (or not added) to it.
  • It’s a healthier option. When you make your baby’s food, you can be certain that you’re using the freshest produce available, and that you’re cooking it in a way that maximizes its nutritional content. That makes homemade baby food a healthier choice.

THE CONS

  • It’s time-consuming. Making your own baby food doesn’t have to take forever, especially if you use a combination of fresh and frozen food, or if you invest in a few of the gadgets that are designed to make the process quicker. But preparing your baby’s food yourself still takes more time and effort than buying it at the store. And for some of you, that’s extra time that you simply don’t have.
  • It doesn’t store or transport as well as jarred baby food. Homemade baby food needs to be refrigerated in order to keep or at least not left out very long. You can also freeze your baby food in small quantities for long-term storage, but this means having to defrost your baby’s meals every time she’s ready to eat. And if you and your baby will be on the go at mealtime, it’s may make transporting the food a bit harder, especially if you need to pack it in a cooler.

Baby Food: Buy It or Make It?

Here’s the thing — you don’t have to choose. Why not both? It’d cost a lot to buy every bit of your baby’s food; on the other hand, it might not be feasible for you to make every bit of it, either. You know your schedule and your budget better than anyone, after all. If you have time to make batches of baby food and freeze them for later, great! Your wallet will thank you, and you’ll know your baby’s diet is nutritious. But you may still need to keep some jars of baby food on hand for those occasional meals out.

Of course, if your schedule’s really busy, you may have to rely a lot more on jarred, prepared baby foods. And that’s okay!  As mentioned above, jarred, store bought baby food is better now that when you were a baby, so this is still a good option. Maybe you could pick a weekend here or there and spend an hour in the kitchen, making as much homemade food as you can. Working even a little homemade baby food into the rotation will save you money and help ensure that your baby is eating well.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly mean plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

Buy It?  Make It?  Both?  Share your thoughts!

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